Fatigue: Biomedicine, Health & Behavior - Volume 4, Issue 4, 2016

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Titles and abstracts for the journal, Fatigue: Biomedicine, Health & Behavior, Volume 4, Issue 4, 2016.

Volume 4, Issue 4, 2016[edit | edit source]

  • [http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/21641846.2016.1246513 Editorial - Understanding cancer-related fatigue: advancing the science (FULL TEXT) by Michael Renner and Leorey N. Saligan[1]
  • Letter to the editor - Diary-based outcome predictors in a self-management trial in chronic fatigue syndrome[2]
  • Mortality in patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome
    Abstract - Background: There is a dearth of research examining mortality in individuals with myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Some studies suggest there is an elevated risk of suicide and earlier mortality compared to national norms. However, findings are inconsistent. Objective: This study sought to determine if patients are reportedly dying earlier than the overall population from the same cause. Methods: Family, friends, and caregivers of deceased patients were recruited. This study analyzed data including cause and age of death for 56 individuals. Results: The findings suggest patients in this sample are at a significantly increased risk of earlier all-cause (M = 55.9 years) and cardiovascular-related (M = 58.8 years) mortality, and they had a directionally lower age of death for suicide (M = 41.3 years) and cancer (M = 66.3 years) compared to the overall U.S. population [M = 73.5 (all-cause), 77.7 (cardiovascular), 47.4 (suicide), and 71.1 (cancer) years of age]. Conclusions: Results suggest there is an increase in risk for earlier mortality in patients. Due to sample size and over-representation of severely ill patients, the findings should be replicated to determine if the directional differences for suicide and cancer mortality are significantly different from the overall population.[3]
  • Treatment of insomnia reduces fatigue in chronic fatigue syndrome in those able to comply with the intervention
    Abstract - Background: Effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) has not been explored in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), a condition where disturbed sleep is a principal symptom. This study aimed to report feasibility, acceptability and initial effectiveness of CBT-I in CFS. Methods: Sixteen individuals with CFS received face-to-face CBT-I. Treatment comprised six sessions of sleep education, hygiene, restriction, stimulus control and cognitive therapy and completion of daily sleep diaries with an overarching aim to establish regularity in sleep-wake patterns. Patients completed self-report questionnaires (fatigue, pain, mood, sleep preoccupation, insomnia severity, and dysfunctional beliefs about sleep) pre- and post-treatment. Results: Of the seven who completed the intervention five improved on self-reported sleep parameters (diary measures of sleep onset latency, awakenings during the night) following treatment. However, CBT-I was not acceptable for all (56%). Total fatigue (Chalder Fatigue), dropped from mean 22 to 16. Those not able to complete the intervention had higher fatigue, pain, depression and anxiety and reported more severe insomnia at baseline compared to completers. Conclusion: CBT-I is an acceptable non-pharmacological approach with potential to treat sleep disturbances in some CFS patients. Strategies to reduce attrition and increase adherence are necessary, possibly telephone or online sessions, for this group.[4]
  • Perceived stress, illness invalidation, and symptom severity in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome
    Abstract - Background: Qualitative studies indicate that individuals with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) commonly experience illness invalidation from medical professionals that is often experienced as stressful and may contribute to strained patient–provider relationships, transfers of care, and/or decreased treatment adherence. Purpose: To examine the impact of perceived stress and illness invalidation from medical professionals on ME/CFS symptom severity. Methods: Adults with ME/CFS (N = 266) participated in an online survey, where they completed the Illness Invalidation Inventory (I*3) [Kool MB, van Middendorp H, Lumley MA, et al. Lack of understanding in fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis: the Illness Invalidation Inventory (3*I). Ann Rheum Dis. 2010;69:1990–1995.], the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) [Cohen S, Kamarck T, Mermelstein R. A global measure of perceived stress. J Health Soc Behav. 1983;24:385–396.], and the CDC Symptom Inventory for Assessment of CFS. Results were evaluated via hierarchical regression. Results: Neither perceived stress nor illness invalidation from medical professionals were significant predictors of ME/CFS symptom severity. Illness invalidation from medical professionals was positively correlated with illness invalidation from family, work colleagues, and social service workers. Conclusions: Results called into question the influence of psychological stress in ME/CFS symptom exacerbation, thus contributing additional information to the body of literature exploring the underlying mechanisms of ME/CFS. Additionally, this study suggested the particular importance of medical providers striving to create a validating relationship with patients who have ME/CFS.[5]
  • Treatment of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome and management of myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome following suspected West Nile virus infection
    Abstract - Background: Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) and myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) have been associated with a variety of viral triggers, but to the best of our knowledge, cases following West Nile virus (WNV) infection are not yet reported in the literature. Here we present a case meeting the criteria for POTS, ME/CFS, and fibromyalgia following a likely WNV infection. Purpose: To present a case suggesting WNV as another possible trigger of POTS and ME/CFS, and to highlight the importance of POTS evaluation and treatment. Methods: The patient presented to a chronic fatigue clinic in 2012. Multiple behavioral and pharmaceutical interventions were integrated, particularly targeting POTS symptoms. Results: As the patient’s POTS symptoms significantly diminished, widespread pain was eliminated, and fitness and function improved. The patient still manages ME/CFS symptoms, although post-exertional malaise is less severe. Conclusions: This case report demonstrates the importance of the evaluation and treatment for POTS in presentations of chronic fatigue. This case also contributes to the list of possible viral triggers of POTS and ME/CFS and enduring consequences of acute flavivirus infection. These findings are important from a public health standpoint since WNV has become the most common arboviral infection in the U.S.A.[6]
  • Corrigendum - a paper was originally published with errors, these have now been corrected in the online and print versions[7]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Renner, Michael; Saligan, Leorey N. (2016), "Understanding cancer-related fatigue: advancing the science", Fatigue: Biomedicine, Health & Behavior, 4 (4): 189-192, doi:10.1080/21641846.2016.1246513 
  2. Jenna L. Adamowicz & Indre Caikauskaite. (2016). Diary-based outcome predictors in a self-management trial in chronic fatigue syndrome. Fatigue: Biomedicine, Health & Behavior 4 (4):193-194. doi:10.1080/21641846.2016.1217666
  3. McManimen, Stephanie L.; Devendorf, Andrew R.; Brown, Abigail A.; Moore, Billie C.; Moore, James H.; Jason, Leonard A. (2016), "Mortality in patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome", Fatigue: Biomedicine, Health & Behavior, 4 (4): 195-207, doi:10.1080/21641846.2016.1236588 
  4. Gotts, Zoe; Deary, Vincent; Newton, Julia; Ellis, Jason (2016), "Treatment of insomnia reduces fatigue in chronic fatigue syndrome in those able to comply with the intervention", Fatigue: Biomedicine, Health & Behavior, 4 (4): 208-216, doi:10.1080/21641846.2016.1222699 
  5. Elizabeth A. Kendrick and Denise Beesley (2016). Perceived stress, illness invalidation, and symptom severity in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome. Fatigue: Biomedicine, Health & Behavior 4 (4):217-225. doi:10.1080/21641846.2016.1250862
  6. Baldwin, Nicole L.; Murray, Kristy O.; Garcia, Melissa N.; Bateman, Lucinda (2016), "Treatment of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome and management of myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome following suspected West Nile virus infection", Fatigue: Biomedicine, Health & Behavior, 4 (4): 226-236, doi:10.1080/21641846.2016.1247971 
  7. Strand, Elin B.; Lillestøl, Kristine; Jason, Leonard A.; Tveito, Kari; Diep, Lien My; Valla, Simen Strand; Sunnquist, Madison; Helland, Ingrid B.; Dammen, Toril (2016), "Comparing the DePaul Symptom Questionnaire with physician assessments: a preliminary study.", Fatigue: Biomedicine, Health & Behavior, 4 (1): 52-62, doi:10.1080/21641846.2015.1126026 

Myalgic encephalomyelitis or M.E. has different diagnostic criteria to chronic fatigue syndrome; neurological symptoms are required but fatigue is an optional symptom.Cite error: Closing </ref> missing for <ref> tag

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