Candida Albicans Overgrowth hypothesis

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history
Jump to: navigation, search
Candida albicans overgrowth may be caused by antibiotics after an infection. This may inhibit the carbohydrate metabolism, activating the immune system, causing a real sense of illness and fatigue. Treatment is challenging, and includes dietary suggestions.


Theory[edit | edit source]

Candida albicans overgrowth could be originated to an antibiotic treatment after an infection. The candida albicans overgrowth in the stomach and bowel might be a root cause for reduced ability to convert glucose to cell energy, influenced by the amino acid tryptophan in the metabolism. This may activate the immune system, causing sense of illness and fatigue. Treatment of the candida albicans overgrowth is challenging and a specific diet is suggested for treatment during 3-4 months.

Evidence[edit | edit source]

Candida albicans overgrowth in the stomach and bowel might be a root cause for a metabolic trap leading to reduced ability to convert glucose to cell energy, similar to the Warburg effect[1]. It is also suggested that candida albicans overgrowth could be caused by an antibiotic treatment after an infection[2]. In addition, it is also mentioned that the amino acid tryptophan could be inhibited by candida albicans overgrowth.[3] This may activate the immune system, causing sense of illness and fatigue[4]. Treatment of the candida albicans overgrowth using probiotics/antimycotics or tryptophan was not effective, and a specific diet (low carbohydrate, fat rich etc.) in addition to turmeric mixtures was suggested for treatment during 3-4 months.[5]


Published Studies[edit | edit source]

Talks & Interviews[edit | edit source]


See Also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. van der Heiden, Matthew G.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Thompson, Craig B. (May 2009). "Understanding the Warburg Effect: The Metabolic Requirements of Cell Proliferation". Science. 
  2. Zelante, Teresa; Iannitti, Rossana G.; Cunha, Cristina; De Luca, Antonella; Giovannini, Gloria; Pieraccini, Giuseppe; Zecchi, Riccardo; D’Angelo, Carmen; Massi-Benedetti, Cristina (Aug 2013). "Tryptophan Catabolites from Microbiota Engage Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor and Balance Mucosal Reactivity via Interleukin-22". Immunity. 39 (2): 372–385. doi:10.1016/j.immuni.2013.08.003. ISSN 1074-7613. 
  3. Romani, Luigina; Zelante, Teresa; De Luca, Antonella; Iannitti, Rossana G.; Moretti, Silvia; Bartoli, Andrea; Aversa, Franco; Puccetti, Paolo (Nov 2014). "Microbiota control of a tryptophan-AhR pathway in disease tolerance to fungi". European Journal of Immunology. 44 (11): 3192–3200. doi:10.1002/eji.201344406. ISSN 1521-4141. PMID 25256754. 
  4. Roager, Henrik M.; Licht, Tine R. (Aug 2018). "Microbial tryptophan catabolites in health and disease". Nature. 
  5. Berstad, Arnold (Nov 14, 2018), IBS, fibromyalgia and ME: Symptoms, patogenesis and treatment, Norwegian ME Association 

Myalgic encephalomyelitis or M.E. has different diagnostic criteria to chronic fatigue syndrome; neurological symptoms are required but fatigue is an optional symptom.<ref name="ICP2011primer">{{Citation

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.