Glossary

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This page is a glossary of key ME/CFS-related terms. (For help editing this page, see Help:Glossary.)


A

Accuracy






accuracy
accuracy - The "closeness of an observation to the true clinical state". With respect to diagnostic tests, "accuracy" means how specific and sensitive the test is.
  • accuracy - The "closeness of an observation to the true clinical state".[1] With respect to diagnostic tests, "accuracy" means how specific and sensitive the test is.[2]


Action for M.E.





AfME
Action for ME
Action for ME (AfME) - Action for ME is a British non-profit organization that was set up in 1987 as The M.E. Action Campaign. Its founders were Martin Lev, Sue Findlay and Clare Francis. In September 1993 it changed its name and logo to Action for ME and Chronic Fatigue. It then changed its name in 1993 to Action for ME.
  • Action for ME (AfME) - Action for ME is a British non-profit organization that was set up in 1987 as The M.E. Action Campaign. Its founders were Martin Lev, Sue Findlay and Clare Francis. In September 1993 it changed its name and logo to Action for ME and Chronic Fatigue. It then changed its name in 1993 to Action for ME.[3]


Adverse reactions
Adverse reaction
adverse reactions
side effect
side effects
Side effect
Side effects
Side Effect
Side Effects


adverse reaction
adverse reaction - Any unintended or unwanted response to the treatment under investigation in a clinical trial.
  • adverse reaction - Any unintended or unwanted response to the treatment under investigation in a clinical trial.[4]



Agency for healthcare research and quality





AHRQ
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality is a United States government agency under the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Their mission is "to produce evidence to make health care safer, higher quality, more accessible, equitable, and affordable. A representative of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality sat on the (now disbanded) CFSAC committee as an Ex Officio Member.



All Party Parliamentary Group on Myalgic Encephalomyelitis
All-Party Parliamentary Group
All Party Parliamentary Group
All-Party Parliamentary Group on ME
All Party Parliamentary Group on ME
All-party Parliamentary Group on Myalgic Encephalomyelitis
All-party Parliamentary Group on ME
All-party Parliamentary Group


APPG
All-Party Parliamentary Group on Myalgic Encephalomyelitis
All-Party Parliamentary Group on Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (APPG) - A British group of backbench members of parliament, from all political parties and from Houses of Commons and Lords, who meet to discuss ME.


American Psychiatric Assoc





APA
American Psychiatric Association
American Psychiatric Association (APA) - The main professional organization of psychiatrists and trainee psychiatrists in the United States, and the largest psychiatric organization in the world. Not to be confused with the American Psychological Association (also APA).
  • American Psychiatric Association (APA) - The main professional organization of psychiatrists and trainee psychiatrists in the United States, and the largest psychiatric organization in the world.[6] Not to be confused with the American Psychological Association (also APA).


Antibody
Antibodies
antibodies
Immunoglobulin
immunoglobulin
Immunoglobulins
immunoglobulins



antibody
antibody - Antibodies or immunoglobulin refers to any of a large number of specific proteins produced by B cells that act against an antigen in an immune response.
  • antibody - Antibodies or immunoglobulin refers to any of a large number of specific proteins produced by B cells that act against an antigen in an immune response.




Apoptosis
apoptotic
Apoptotic
programmed cell death
Programmed cell death




apoptosis
apoptosis - a type of cell death in which a cell, in response to a threat, initiates a series of molecular steps that lead to its orderly death. This is one method the body uses to get rid of unneeded or abnormal cells. This form of cell suicide is also called programmed cell death.
  • apoptosis - a type of cell death in which a cell, in response to a threat, initiates a series of molecular steps that lead to its orderly death. This is one method the body uses to get rid of unneeded or abnormal cells. This form of cell suicide is also called programmed cell death.[7]



Assay
Assays
assays
Assaying
assaying
Assayed
assayed



assay
assay - 1. (verb) analysis (as of an ore or drug) to determine the presence, absence, or quantity of one or more components. 2. (noun) In biochemistry, any laboratory protocol used to test a sample for one or more qualities.
  • assay - 1. (verb) analysis (as of an ore or drug) to determine the presence, absence, or quantity of one or more components.[8] 2. (noun) In biochemistry, any laboratory protocol used to test a sample for one or more qualities.


Associated New Zealand M.E. Society
Associated New Zealand M.E. society





ANZMES
Associated New Zealand ME Society
Associated New Zealand ME Society (ANZMES) - A New Zealand group for myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) patients and their caregivers.


Association of Young People with M.E.





AYME
Association of Young People with ME
Association of Young People with ME (AYME) - AYME was a UK national charity supporting children and young people affected by ME/CFS with members under 25. Its lead medical advisor was Doctor Esther Crawley. In April 2017 the charity merged with Action for ME, forming its Children's Services department run by Mary-Jane Willows.


B

B cells
B-cell
B lymphocyte
B lymphocytes
B-cells




B cell
B cell - B lymphocyte, or a type of white blood cell, which is involved in the immune response by secreting antibodies to ward off infections. In mammals, they are mostly matured in the bone marrow.
  • B cell - B lymphocyte, or a type of white blood cell, which is involved in the immune response by secreting antibodies to ward off infections. In mammals, they are mostly matured in the bone marrow.[10]


Bias
Biased
biased





bias
bias - Bias in research is "a systematic deviation of an observation from the true clinical state".
  • bias - Bias in research is "a systematic deviation of an observation from the true clinical state".[1]


BPS model
BPS Model
Biopsychosocial model
biopsychosocial
Biopsychosocial
Biopsychosocial Model



BPS
biopsychosocial model
biopsychosocial model (BPS) - A school of thought, usually based in psychology, which claims illness and disease to be the result of the intermingling of biological, psychological and social causes. (Learn more: en.wikipedia.org)
  • biopsychosocial model (BPS) - A school of thought, usually based in psychology, which claims illness and disease to be the result of the intermingling of biological, psychological and social causes. (Learn more: en.wikipedia.org)


British Medical Journal






BMJ
BMJ - The BMJ (previously the British Medical Journal) is a weekly peer-reviewed medical journal.
  • BMJ - The BMJ (previously the British Medical Journal) is a weekly peer-reviewed medical journal.



Bradycardia






bradycardia
bradycardia - A slowness of the heartbeat, so that the pulse rate is less than 60 per minute in an adult.
  • bradycardia - A slowness of the heartbeat, so that the pulse rate is less than 60 per minute in an adult.[11]

C

Canadian consensus criteria





CCC
Canadian Consensus Criteria
Canadian Consensus Criteria (CCC) - A set of diagnostic criteria used to diagnose ME/CFS, developed by a group of practicing ME/CFS clinicians in 2003. The CCC is often considered to be the most complex criteria, but possibly the most accurate, with the lowest number of patients meeting the criteria. Led to the development of the International Consensus Criteria (ICC) in 2011.
  • Canadian Consensus Criteria (CCC) - A set of diagnostic criteria used to diagnose ME/CFS, developed by a group of practicing ME/CFS clinicians in 2003. The CCC is often considered to be the most complex criteria, but possibly the most accurate, with the lowest number of patients meeting the criteria. Led to the development of the International Consensus Criteria (ICC) in 2011.[12]






Cell membrane
Cell membranes
cell membranes
Plasma membrane
plasma membrane
Plasma membranes
plasma membranes



cell membrane
cell membrane - A very thin membrane, composed of lipids and protein, that surrounds the cytoplasm of a cell and controls the passage of substances into and out of the cell.
  • cell membrane - A very thin membrane, composed of lipids and protein, that surrounds the cytoplasm of a cell and controls the passage of substances into and out of the cell.[13]


Centers for Disease Control
Center for Disease Control





CDC
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) - The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is the leading public health institute of the United States government.


Central nervous system
Central Nervous System





CNS
central nervous system
central nervous system (CNS) - One of the two parts of the human nervous system, the other part being the peripheral nervous system. The central nervous system consists of the brain and spinal cord, while the peripheral nervous system consists of nerves that travel from the central nervous system into the various organs and tissues of the body.
  • central nervous system (CNS) - One of the two parts of the human nervous system, the other part being the peripheral nervous system. The central nervous system consists of the brain and spinal cord, while the peripheral nervous system consists of nerves that travel from the central nervous system into the various organs and tissues of the body.


Cerebellum
cerebellar
Cerebellar





cerebellum
cerebellum - A part of the brain at the back of the skull in vertebrates, beneath the occipital lobe of the cerebrum. Its name reflects the fact that it looks like a smaller version of the cerebrum. Its main known functions are the coordination of unconscious muscle movements and the maintenance of body positional equilibrium.
  • cerebellum - A part of the brain at the back of the skull in vertebrates, beneath the occipital lobe of the cerebrum. Its name reflects the fact that it looks like a smaller version of the cerebrum. Its main known functions are the coordination of unconscious muscle movements and the maintenance of body positional equilibrium.[14]







Chronic disease
Chronic Disease
chronic diseases
Chronic diseases
Chronic Diseases




chronic disease
chronic disease - a disease or condition that usually lasts for 3 months or longer and may get worse over time
  • chronic disease - a disease or condition that usually lasts for 3 months or longer and may get worse over time[15]


Chronic fatigue





CF
chronic fatigue
chronic fatigue (CF) - Persistent and abnormal fatigue is a symptom, not an illness. It may be caused by depression, multiple sclerosis, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome or many other illnesses. The term "chronic fatigue" should never be confused with the disease chronic fatigue syndrome.
  • chronic fatigue (CF) - Persistent and abnormal fatigue is a symptom, not an illness. It may be caused by depression, multiple sclerosis, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome or many other illnesses. The term "chronic fatigue" should never be confused with the disease chronic fatigue syndrome.[16]


Chronic Fatigue Immune Dysfunction Syndrome
Chronic Fatigue & Immune Dysfunction Syndrome
Chronic fatigue and immune dysfunction syndrome
Chronic fatigue immune dysfunction syndrome




CFIDS
Chronic Fatigue and Immune Dysfunction Syndrome
Chronic Fatigue and Immune Dysfunction Syndrome (CFIDS) - Chronic Fatigue and Immune Dysfunction Syndrome is another term for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, but one which emphasizes the immunological aspects of the disease. Popular in the 1990's, this term has apparently fallen into disuse.
  • Chronic Fatigue and Immune Dysfunction Syndrome (CFIDS) - Chronic Fatigue and Immune Dysfunction Syndrome is another term for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, but one which emphasizes the immunological aspects of the disease. Popular in the 1990's, this term has apparently fallen into disuse.


Chronic fatigue syndrome
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
C.F.S.




CFS
chronic fatigue syndrome
chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A controversial term, invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, that generally refers to a collection of symptoms as “fatigue”. There have been multiple attempts to come up with a set of diagnostic criteria to define this term, but few of those diagnostic criteria are currently in use. Previous attempts to define this term include the Fukuda criteria and the Oxford criteria. Some view the term as a useful diagnostic category for people with long-term fatigue of unexplained origin. Others view the term as a derogatory term borne out of animus towards patients. Some view the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, while others view myalgic encephalomyelitis as a distinct disease.
  • chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A controversial term, invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, that generally refers to a collection of symptoms as “fatigue”. There have been multiple attempts to come up with a set of diagnostic criteria to define this term, but few of those diagnostic criteria are currently in use. Previous attempts to define this term include the Fukuda criteria and the Oxford criteria. Some view the term as a useful diagnostic category for people with long-term fatigue of unexplained origin. Others view the term as a derogatory term borne out of animus towards patients. Some view the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, while others view myalgic encephalomyelitis as a distinct disease.


Chronic fatigue syndrome advisory committee
chronic fatigue syndrome advisory committee





CFSAC
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Advisory Committee
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Advisory Committee (CFSAC) - (sometimes pronounced SIF-SACK) A US government advisory council that met twice per year, covering current topics related to Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Meetings usually lasted for two days and the results were presented to the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS). After 15 years, on September 5, 2018, CFSAC's charter was not renewed by the Department of HHS, effectively dissolving the committee without notice or warning.
  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Advisory Committee (CFSAC) - (sometimes pronounced SIF-SACK) A US government advisory council that met twice per year, covering current topics related to Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Meetings usually lasted for two days and the results were presented to the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS). After 15 years, on September 5, 2018, CFSAC's charter was not renewed by the Department of HHS, effectively dissolving the committee without notice or warning.[17]


clivi
Clivus
Clivi





clivus
clivus - the smooth sloping surface on the upper posterior part of the body of the sphenoid bone supporting the pons and the basilar artery
  • clivus - the smooth sloping surface on the upper posterior part of the body of the sphenoid bone supporting the pons and the basilar artery[18]





Coenzyme Q10
co-enzyme Q10
Co-enzyme Q10
COQ10
ubiquinone
ubiquinol
Ubiquinone
Ubiquinol


CoQ10
coenzyme Q10
coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) - Coenzyme Q10 (also known as ubiquinone) is found in the mitochondria and, as a component of the electron transport chain, plays an important role in aerobic respiration. The chemically-reduced form of CoQ10 is called ubiquinol.
  • coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) - Coenzyme Q10 (also known as ubiquinone) is found in the mitochondria and, as a component of the electron transport chain, plays an important role in aerobic respiration. The chemically-reduced form of CoQ10 is called ubiquinol.


cofactors
Cofactor
Cofactors





cofactor
cofactor - A substance that acts with another substance to bring about certain effects. In biochemistry, a cofactor is a molecule that is necessary for a given biochemical reaction, but is not an enzyme or substrate of the reaction.
  • cofactor - A substance that acts with another substance to bring about certain effects.[19] In biochemistry, a cofactor is a molecule that is necessary for a given biochemical reaction, but is not an enzyme or substrate of the reaction.


Cognition
Cognitive
cognitive
Cognitions
cognitions




cognition
cognition - Thought processes, including attention, reasoning, and memory.
  • cognition - Thought processes, including attention, reasoning, and memory.


Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
Cognitive behavioral therapy
Cognitive behavioural therapy
Cognitive Behavioural Therapy
cognitive behavioural therapy
cognitive-behavioral therapy
Cognitive-behavioral therapy
cognitive-behavioural therapy
Cognitive-behavioural therapy
CBT
cognitive behavioral therapy
cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) - A type of psychotherapy geared toward modifying alleged unhealthy thinking, behaviors or illness beliefs. One of the treatment arms used in the controversial PACE trial.






Cytomegalovirus





CMV
cytomegalovirus
cytomegalovirus (CMV) - A common herpesvirus found in humans. Like other herpesviruses, it is a life-long infection that remains in a latent state inside the human body, until it is 'reactivated' by appropriate conditions. CMV infects between 60% to 70% of adults in industrialized countries and close to 100% in emerging countries. Much is unknown about this virus, although it has been found in salivary glands and myeloid blood cells such as monocytes. It has also been linked to the development of certain cancers. Congenital CMV is a leading infectious cause of deafness, learning disabilities, and intellectual disability. A common treatment for CMV is valganciclovir, commonly known as Valcyte.
  • cytomegalovirus (CMV) - A common herpesvirus found in humans. Like other herpesviruses, it is a life-long infection that remains in a latent state inside the human body, until it is 'reactivated' by appropriate conditions. CMV infects between 60% to 70% of adults in industrialized countries and close to 100% in emerging countries. Much is unknown about this virus, although it has been found in salivary glands and myeloid blood cells such as monocytes. It has also been linked to the development of certain cancers. Congenital CMV is a leading infectious cause of deafness, learning disabilities, and intellectual disability. A common treatment for CMV is valganciclovir, commonly known as Valcyte.[20]

D

E

Endogenous






endogenous
endogenous - Growing or originating from within an organism.
  • endogenous - Growing or originating from within an organism.[21]


Energy envelope theory
energy envelope theory





Energy Envelope Theory
Energy Envelope Theory - A self-management tool developed and tested by Dr. Leonard Jason to reduce symptom severity and the frequency of relapses for people with ME/CFS. According to this theory, ME/CFS patients should not expend more energy than they perceive they have, as this results in post-exertional malaise and higher disability. Instead patients are advised to stay within their energy envelope, meaning the physical limits the disease has imposed upon them. As the energy envelope theory also cautions about the dangers of under-exertion, its principles are almost identical to ‘pacing’, an activity management strategy for ME patients devised by Ellen Goudsmit in the UK.
  • Energy Envelope Theory - A self-management tool developed and tested by Dr. Leonard Jason to reduce symptom severity and the frequency of relapses for people with ME/CFS. According to this theory, ME/CFS patients should not expend more energy than they perceive they have, as this results in post-exertional malaise and higher disability. Instead patients are advised to stay within their energy envelope, meaning the physical limits the disease has imposed upon them.[22] As the energy envelope theory also cautions about the dangers of under-exertion, its principles are almost identical to ‘pacing’, an activity management strategy for ME patients devised by Ellen Goudsmit in the UK.[23]


Enterovirus
enteroviruses
Enteroviruses
enteroviral
Enteroviral




enterovirus
enterovirus - A genus of RNA viruses which typically enter the body through the respiratory or gastrointestinal systems and sometimes spread to the central nervous system or other parts of the body, causing neurological, cardiac, and other damage. Since the first reports of myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), enteroviruses have been suspected as a cause of ME. Enteroviruses have also been implicated as the cause of Type I diabetes, congestive heart failure, and other conditions. Enteroviruses include poliovirus, coxsackieviruses, and many others. New enteroviruses and new strains of existing enteroviruses are continuously being discovered. (Learn more: viralzone.expasy.org)
  • enterovirus - A genus of RNA viruses which typically enter the body through the respiratory or gastrointestinal systems and sometimes spread to the central nervous system or other parts of the body, causing neurological, cardiac, and other damage. Since the first reports of myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), enteroviruses have been suspected as a cause of ME. Enteroviruses have also been implicated as the cause of Type I diabetes, congestive heart failure, and other conditions. Enteroviruses include poliovirus, coxsackieviruses, and many others. New enteroviruses and new strains of existing enteroviruses are continuously being discovered. (Learn more: viralzone.expasy.org)


Enzyme
enzymes
Enzymes





enzyme
enzyme - a substance produced by a living organism which acts as a catalyst to bring about a specific biochemical reaction.
  • enzyme - a substance produced by a living organism which acts as a catalyst to bring about a specific biochemical reaction.[24]


Epigenome
epigenomes
Epigenomes





epigenome
epigenome - all of the chemical compounds that are not part of the DNA sequence, but are on or attached to DNA as a way to regulate gene activity
  • epigenome - all of the chemical compounds that are not part of the DNA sequence, but are on or attached to DNA as a way to regulate gene activity[25]


Eukaryote
eukaryotes
Eukaryotes
eukaryotic
Eukaryotic
eucaryote
Eucaryote
eucaryotes
Eucaryotes
eucaryotic
eukaryote
eukaryote - any cell or organism that possesses a clearly defined nucleus, unlike bacteria. Eukaryotes include yeast, fungus, plants, and animals.
  • eukaryote - any cell or organism that possesses a clearly defined nucleus, unlike bacteria.[26] Eukaryotes include yeast, fungus, plants, and animals.

F

Foramen magnum
Foramen Magnum





foramen magnum
foramen magnum - the large opening in the skull through which the spinal cord passes to merge with the lower brain
  • foramen magnum - the large opening in the skull through which the spinal cord passes to merge with the lower brain[27]


Fukuda diagnostic criteria
Fukuda Criteria
Fukuda Diagnostic Criteria





Fukuda criteria
Fukuda criteria - The most commonly used diagnostic criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome, created by the United States Centers for Disease Control (CDC).
  • Fukuda criteria - The most commonly used diagnostic criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome, created by the United States Centers for Disease Control (CDC).[28]

G

Genome
genomes
Genomes





genome
genome - an organism’s complete set of DNA, including all of its genes
  • genome - an organism’s complete set of DNA, including all of its genes[29]



Glutamate
glutamic acid
Glutamic acid
Glutamic Acid




Glu
glutamate
glutamate (Glu) - Glutamate is one of the amino acids used by the body to make proteins. It is a salt or ester of glutamic acid, and the terms glutamate and glutamic acid are often used interchangeably. It also functions as the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain.
  • glutamate (Glu) - Glutamate is one of the amino acids used by the body to make proteins. It is a salt or ester of glutamic acid, and the terms glutamate and glutamic acid are often used interchangeably. It also functions as the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain.[30][31]



Graded Exercise Therapy
Graded exercise therapy





GET
graded exercise therapy
graded exercise therapy (GET) - A gradual increase in exercise or activity, according to a pre-defined plan. Focuses on overcoming the patient's alleged unhelpful illness beliefs that exertion can exacerbate symptoms, rather than on reversing physical deconditioning. Considered controversial, and possibly harmful, in the treatment or management of ME. One of the treatment arms of the controversial PACE trial.
  • graded exercise therapy (GET) - A gradual increase in exercise or activity, according to a pre-defined plan. Focuses on overcoming the patient's alleged unhelpful illness beliefs that exertion can exacerbate symptoms, rather than on reversing physical deconditioning. Considered controversial, and possibly harmful, in the treatment or management of ME. One of the treatment arms of the controversial PACE trial.[32]

H

Heart rate monitor
Heart Rate Monitor
heart rate monitors
Heart rate monitors
Heart Rate Monitors




heart rate monitor
heart rate monitor - A device that measures your heart rate (pulse rate). Heart rate monitors may come as a chest strap, wrist strap, smartwatch, or even as a mobile phone app. Heart rate monitors are often used by ME/CFS patients to pace their exertion, in order to avoid post-exertional malaise (PEM). For more information, see pacing with a heart rate monitor.
  • heart rate monitor - A device that measures your heart rate (pulse rate). Heart rate monitors may come as a chest strap, wrist strap, smartwatch, or even as a mobile phone app. Heart rate monitors are often used by ME/CFS patients to pace their exertion, in order to avoid post-exertional malaise (PEM). For more information, see pacing with a heart rate monitor.


Heart rate variability
Heart Rate Variability





HRV
heart rate variability
heart rate variability (HRV) - A measurement of the variability of the heart rate over time. When the heart rate is consistent, there will be a low heart rate variability. When the heart rate is constantly changing, there will be a high heart rate variability. Heart rate variability is often used by ME/CFS patients to monitor their autonomic nervous system, as high heart rate variability is associated with the sympathetic nervous system and low heart rate variability is associated with the parasympathetic nervous system.
  • heart rate variability (HRV) - A measurement of the variability of the heart rate over time. When the heart rate is consistent, there will be a low heart rate variability. When the heart rate is constantly changing, there will be a high heart rate variability. Heart rate variability is often used by ME/CFS patients to monitor their autonomic nervous system, as high heart rate variability is associated with the sympathetic nervous system and low heart rate variability is associated with the parasympathetic nervous system.




Human leukocyte antigen complex
Human Leukocyte Antigen Complex
human leucocyte antigen complex
Human leucocyte antigen complex
Human Leucocyte Antigen Complex



HLA
human leukocyte antigen complex
human leukocyte antigen complex (HLA) - A set of genes responsible for a given person's immune response to potential threats. Specifically, HLA genes encode proteins which help the immune system to distinguish the body's own proteins from proteins which are made by foreign invaders like bacteria and viruses. The HLA complex can vary greatly from person to person, generating unique immune and allergic responses. (Learn more: mecfsresearchreview.me)
  • human leukocyte antigen complex (HLA) - A set of genes responsible for a given person's immune response to potential threats. Specifically, HLA genes encode proteins which help the immune system to distinguish the body's own proteins from proteins which are made by foreign invaders like bacteria and viruses. The HLA complex can vary greatly from person to person, generating unique immune and allergic responses. (Learn more: mecfsresearchreview.me)


Hypoglycemia
hypoglycemic
Hypoglycemic
hypoglycemics
Hypoglycemics
hypoglycaemia
Hypoglycaemia
hypoglycaemic
Hypoglycaemic


hypoglycemia
hypoglycemia - abnormal decrease of sugar in the blood
  • hypoglycemia - abnormal decrease of sugar in the blood[33]

I

Iatrogenesis
Iatrogenic
iatrogenic





iatrogenesis
iatrogenesis - Accidental harm caused by a doctor, by medical treatment, or by diagnostic procedures.
  • iatrogenesis - Accidental harm caused by a doctor, by medical treatment, or by diagnostic procedures.[34]





immunomodulatory
Immunomodulator
Immunomodulatory





immunomodulator
immunomodulator - a substance that affects the functioning of the immune system
  • immunomodulator - a substance that affects the functioning of the immune system[35]



Institute of Medicine Report
IOM Report





IOM report
Institute of Medicine report
Institute of Medicine report (IOM report) - A report that was commissioned by the U.S. government and was published by the Institute of Medicine on February 10, 2015. The report was titled "Beyond Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Redefining an Illness" and proposed the term Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease (SEID). Among its key findings were that "This disease is characterized by profound fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, sleep abnormalities, autonomic manifestations, pain, and other symptoms that are made worse by exertion of any sort." The report further stated "Between 836,000 and 2.5 million Americans suffer from myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome."
  • Institute of Medicine report (IOM report) - A report that was commissioned by the U.S. government and was published by the Institute of Medicine on February 10, 2015. The report was titled "Beyond Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Redefining an Illness" and proposed the term Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease (SEID). Among its key findings were that "This disease is characterized by profound fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, sleep abnormalities, autonomic manifestations, pain, and other symptoms that are made worse by exertion of any sort." The report further stated "Between 836,000 and 2.5 million Americans suffer from myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome."


international classification of diseases
International classification of diseases
International Classification of Disease
international classification of disease
International classification of disease



ICD
International Classification of Diseases
International Classification of Diseases (ICD) - A system of medical diagnostic codes, created by the World Health Organization (WHO), to classify diseases and other health related conditions for the purpose of international consistency. By having common diagnostic codes around the world, health researchers are better able to quantify and track disease burdens. ICD codes are primarily used for diagnosis, and do not imply anything about the mechanism of disease. (Learn more: www.who.int)
  • International Classification of Diseases (ICD) - A system of medical diagnostic codes, created by the World Health Organization (WHO), to classify diseases and other health related conditions for the purpose of international consistency. By having common diagnostic codes around the world, health researchers are better able to quantify and track disease burdens. ICD codes are primarily used for diagnosis, and do not imply anything about the mechanism of disease. (Learn more: www.who.int)


International consensus criteria





ICC
International Consensus Criteria
International Consensus Criteria (ICC) - A set of diagnostic criteria, based on the Canadian Consensus Criteria, that argued for the abandonment of the term "chronic fatigue syndrome" and encouraged the sole use of the term "myalgic encephalomyelitis".


invisible disease






invisible illness
invisible illness - A chronic condition or illness, such as ME/CFS, which may not be apparent to others. Sufferers may look healthy, yet be in poor health. Symptoms of the illness may not be visible and can be misunderstood or go unnoticed by others. Also, patients may wind up secluded or homebound due to the illness and become "invisible".
  • invisible illness - A chronic condition or illness, such as ME/CFS, which may not be apparent to others. Sufferers may look healthy, yet be in poor health. Symptoms of the illness may not be visible and can be misunderstood or go unnoticed by others. Also, patients may wind up secluded or homebound due to the illness and become "invisible".


J

K

L

M

Magnetic levitation device
Magnetic Levitation Device





magnetic levitation device
magnetic levitation device - A device which uses ferrofluid (a liquid which can become magnetized) in a glass capillary tube surrounded by magnets. This creates a density gradient and cells move to their respective densities within the tube. According to Ron Davis, white blood cells in CFS patients may be less dense than those of healthy controls, indicating the possible use of the device as an inexpensive diagnostic test. (Learn more: www.omf.ngo)
  • magnetic levitation device - A device which uses ferrofluid (a liquid which can become magnetized) in a glass capillary tube surrounded by magnets. This creates a density gradient and cells move to their respective densities within the tube. According to Ron Davis, white blood cells in CFS patients may be less dense than those of healthy controls, indicating the possible use of the device as an inexpensive diagnostic test. (Learn more: www.omf.ngo)


Mass spectrometer
Mass Spectrometer
mass spec





mass spectrometer
mass spectrometer - A device which converts molecules to ions, or charged particles. It then uses magnetic and electric fields to sort the ions according to their mass (similar to weight) and charge, in order to identify the molecules or measure their characteristics.
  • mass spectrometer - A device which converts molecules to ions, or charged particles. It then uses magnetic and electric fields to sort the ions according to their mass (similar to weight) and charge, in order to identify the molecules or measure their characteristics.



CFS/ME
ME / CFS
CFS / ME





ME/CFS
ME/CFS - An acronym that combines myalgic encephalomyelitis with chronic fatigue syndrome. Sometimes they are combined because people have trouble distinguishing one from the other. Sometimes they are combined because people see them as synonyms of each other.



MUS
medically unexplained symptoms
Medically unexplained physical symptoms
Medically unexplained symptoms
Medically Unexplained Physical Symptoms
Medically Unexplained Symptoms



MUPS
medically unexplained physical symptoms
medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS) - Technically, this term means that no cause or explanation for the patient's symptoms has yet been found. However, patients diagnosed with "MUPS" are generally lumped into a psychosomatic, or psychologically-caused category by those in the medical profession, without any scientific basis for doing so.
  • medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS) - Technically, this term means that no cause or explanation for the patient's symptoms has yet been found. However, patients diagnosed with "MUPS" are generally lumped into a psychosomatic, or psychologically-caused category by those in the medical profession, without any scientific basis for doing so.



metabolic trap
Metabolic trap
Metabolic Trap





metabolic trap hypothesis
metabolic trap hypothesis - An hypothesis which proposes that the normal metabolic functioning of the cell has become "trapped" in an abnormal state, which may lead to body-wide symptoms.
  • metabolic trap hypothesis - An hypothesis which proposes that the normal metabolic functioning of the cell has become "trapped" in an abnormal state, which may lead to body-wide symptoms.


Metabolite
metabolites
Metabolites





metabolite
metabolite - A chemical compound produced by, or involved in, metabolism. The term is often used to refer to the degradation products of drugs in the body.
  • metabolite - A chemical compound produced by, or involved in, metabolism. The term is often used to refer to the degradation products of drugs in the body.


Metabolomics
metabolomic
Metabolomic





metabolomics
metabolomics - The analysis of the chemical metabolism within cells, tissues or organisms. The term is often used to refer to the full set of metabolites found in a cell in a given environment.
  • metabolomics - The analysis of the chemical metabolism within cells, tissues or organisms. The term is often used to refer to the full set of metabolites found in a cell in a given environment.


Microbiome






microbiome
microbiome - The full collection of microscopic organisms (especially bacteria and fungi) which are present in a particular environment, particularly inside the human body.
  • microbiome - The full collection of microscopic organisms (especially bacteria and fungi) which are present in a particular environment, particularly inside the human body.


Millions missing






Millions Missing
Millions Missing - A global campaign, first led by #MEAction in May 2016, which aims to gain awareness, community, education, research, funding and treatment equality for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis. The campaign uses the hashtag #MillionsMissing on Twitter.
  • Millions Missing - A global campaign, first led by #MEAction in May 2016, which aims to gain awareness, community, education, research, funding and treatment equality for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis. The campaign uses the hashtag #MillionsMissing on Twitter.


Mitochondria
mitochondrion
Mitochondrion
mitochondrial
Mitochondrial




mitochondria
mitochondria - Important parts of the biological cell, with each mitochondrion encased within a mitochondrial membrane. Mitochondria are best known for their role in energy production, earning them the nickname "the powerhouse of the cell". Mitochondria also participate in the detection of threats and the response to these threats. One of the responses to threats orchestrated by mitochondria is apoptosis, a cell suicide program used by cells when the threat can not be eliminated.
  • mitochondria - Important parts of the biological cell, with each mitochondrion encased within a mitochondrial membrane. Mitochondria are best known for their role in energy production, earning them the nickname "the powerhouse of the cell". Mitochondria also participate in the detection of threats and the response to these threats. One of the responses to threats orchestrated by mitochondria is apoptosis, a cell suicide program used by cells when the threat can not be eliminated.



Mouse Models
Mouse model
Mouse models
mouse models
Mouse Model




mouse model
mouse model - The use of special strains of mice to study a human disease or condition, and how to prevent and treat it
  • mouse model - The use of special strains of mice to study a human disease or condition, and how to prevent and treat it[36]




Myalgia






myalgia
myalgia - Muscle pain.


Myalgic Encephalomyelitis
Myalgic encephalomyelitis
Myalgic encephalopathy
Myalgic Encephalopathy
myalgic encephalopathy
M.E.



ME
myalgic encephalomyelitis
myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.
  • myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome.[38] A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.[39]


Myalgic encephalopathy
Myalgic Encephalopathy





myalgic encephalopathy
myalgic encephalopathy - An alternate term that is sometimes used for myalgic encephalomyelitis, by people who believe the evidence for inflammation in ME is insufficient. This terminology reflects the belief that the "-itis" suffix implies inflammation.
  • myalgic encephalopathy - An alternate term that is sometimes used for myalgic encephalomyelitis, by people who believe the evidence for inflammation in ME is insufficient. This terminology reflects the belief that the "-itis" suffix implies inflammation.

N


Nanoneedle
nanoneedles
Nanoneedles





nanoneedle
nanoneedle - A device with microscopic dimensions which measures electrical impedance across a blood cell. According to Ron Davis, the nanoneedle measured increased electrical impedance in the blood cells of 10 ME/CFS patients when stressed with salt, but not in healthy controls. Accordingly, this device has been proposed as a potential diagnostic test to distinguish ME/CFS patients from healthy controls. (Learn more: www.omf.ngo)
  • nanoneedle - A device with microscopic dimensions which measures electrical impedance across a blood cell. According to Ron Davis, the nanoneedle measured increased electrical impedance in the blood cells of 10 ME/CFS patients when stressed with salt, but not in healthy controls. Accordingly, this device has been proposed as a potential diagnostic test to distinguish ME/CFS patients from healthy controls. (Learn more: www.omf.ngo)


NASA ten-minute lean test






NASA 10-minute lean test
NASA 10-minute lean test - A variation of a test used by NASA researchers to test for orthostatic intolerance. A simple test which is recommended by the Bateman Horne Center for ME and Fibromyalgia patients. (Learn more: batemanhornecenter.org)
  • NASA 10-minute lean test - A variation of a test used by NASA researchers to test for orthostatic intolerance. A simple test which is recommended by the Bateman Horne Center for ME and Fibromyalgia patients. (Learn more: batemanhornecenter.org)


National academy of medicine
Institute of Medicine
Institute of medicine
IOM




NAM
National Academy of Medicine
National Academy of Medicine (NAM) - An American non-profit, non-governmental organization which provides expert advice to governmental agencies on issues relating to biomedical science, medicine and health. Formerly known as the Institute of Medicine (IOM).
  • National Academy of Medicine (NAM) - An American non-profit, non-governmental organization which provides expert advice to governmental agencies on issues relating to biomedical science, medicine and health. Formerly known as the Institute of Medicine (IOM).


naturopathy
naturopathic
Naturopath
Naturopathy
Naturopathic




naturopath
naturopath - a practitioner who uses a system of treatment of disease that avoids drugs and surgery and emphasizes the use of natural agents (such as air, water, and herbs) and physical means (such as tissue manipulation and electrotherapy)
  • naturopath - a practitioner who uses a system of treatment of disease that avoids drugs and surgery and emphasizes the use of natural agents (such as air, water, and herbs) and physical means (such as tissue manipulation and electrotherapy)[40]


NICE Guidelines
NICE guideline
NICE Guideline





NICE guidelines
NICE guidelines - Clinical guidelines used in the UK.

O

Orthostatic intolerance
Orthostatic Intolerance





OI
orthostatic intolerance
orthostatic intolerance (OI) - The development of symptoms when standing upright, where symptoms are relieved upon reclining. Patients with orthostatic intolerance have trouble remaining upright for more than a few seconds or a few minutes, depending upon severity. In severe orthostatic intolerance, patients may not be able to sit upright in bed. Orthostatic intolerance is often a sign of dysautonomia. There are different types of orthostatic intolerance, including postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS).
  • orthostatic intolerance (OI) - The development of symptoms when standing upright, where symptoms are relieved upon reclining. Patients with orthostatic intolerance have trouble remaining upright for more than a few seconds or a few minutes, depending upon severity. In severe orthostatic intolerance, patients may not be able to sit upright in bed. Orthostatic intolerance is often a sign of dysautonomia. There are different types of orthostatic intolerance, including postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS).


Oxford Criteria
Oxford diagnostic criteria
Oxford Diagnostic Criteria





Oxford criteria
Oxford criteria - A set of diagnostic criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome. These criteria focus on "fatigue" as the defining symptom.
  • Oxford criteria - A set of diagnostic criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome. These criteria focus on "fatigue" as the defining symptom.


Oxford U.
Oxford Uni
University of Oxford





Oxford University
Oxford University - a prestigious university located in Oxford, England renowned for its teaching and research in health and medicine
  • Oxford University - a prestigious university located in Oxford, England renowned for its teaching and research in health and medicine[42]

P

PACE
PACE Trial





PACE trial
PACE trial - A controversial study which claimed that CBT and GET were effective in treating "CFS/ME", despite the fact that its own data did not support this conclusion. Its results and methodology were widely disputed by patients, scientists, and the peer-reviewed scientific literature.
  • PACE trial - A controversial study which claimed that CBT and GET were effective in treating "CFS/ME", despite the fact that its own data did not support this conclusion. Its results and methodology were widely disputed by patients, scientists, and the peer-reviewed scientific literature.


Pacing






pacing
pacing - The practice of staying within one's "energy envelope" by interspersing periods of activity with periods of rest. ME/CFS patients use pacing to avoid or reduce post-exertional malaise (PEM). Some patients use a heart rate monitor to help with pacing.
  • pacing - The practice of staying within one's "energy envelope" by interspersing periods of activity with periods of rest. ME/CFS patients use pacing to avoid or reduce post-exertional malaise (PEM). Some patients use a heart rate monitor to help with pacing.




Pharyngitis






pharyngitis
pharyngitis - An irritation or swelling of the top part of the throat, at the back of the mouth, usually caused by an infection such as Streptococcus. The hallmark symptom is a sore throat without cough.
  • pharyngitis - An irritation or swelling of the top part of the throat, at the back of the mouth, usually caused by an infection such as Streptococcus. The hallmark symptom is a sore throat without cough.[43][44]


Phase 3
Phase III
Phase three
phase 3
phase III




phase three
phase three - Last phase of clinical trials before a drug can be approved for public use. Whereas Phase one assesses basic safety, and Phase two assesses basic efficacy, Phase three uses many trial participants to fully assess both safety and efficacy.
  • phase three - Last phase of clinical trials before a drug can be approved for public use. Whereas Phase one assesses basic safety, and Phase two assesses basic efficacy, Phase three uses many trial participants to fully assess both safety and efficacy.[45]



Post-exertional malaise
Post-exertional Malaise
Post exertional malaise
post exertional malaise
Post Exertional Malaise
Postexertional malaise
postexertional malaise
Postexertional Malaise


PEM
post-exertional malaise
post-exertional malaise (PEM) - A notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small physical or cognitive exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others.
  • post-exertional malaise (PEM) - A notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small physical or cognitive exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others.


Post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion
Post-exertional Neuroimmune Exhaustion
Postexertional neuroimmune exhaustion
postexertional neuroimmune exhaustion
Postexertional Neuroimmune Exhaustion
Post exertional neuroimmune exhaustion
post exertional neuroimmune exhaustion
Post Exertional Neuroimmune Exhaustion


PENE
post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion
post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE) - An alternative term for post-exertional malaise (PEM), used by people who find that the word 'malaise' fails to capture the serious nature of the condition. Used in the Institute of Medicine (IOM) report.
  • post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE) - An alternative term for post-exertional malaise (PEM), used by people who find that the word 'malaise' fails to capture the serious nature of the condition. Used in the Institute of Medicine (IOM) report.[46]


Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome
Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome





POTS
postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome
postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) - A form of orthostatic intolerance where the cardinal symptom is excessive tachycardia due to changing position (e.g. from lying down to sitting up).



PWME
PwME's
PwMEs
pwme




PwME
PwME - Acronym for a "Person with ME" (myalgic encephalomyelitis).
  • PwME - Acronym for a "Person with ME" (myalgic encephalomyelitis).

Q

R

Ramsay Definition
Ramsay criteria
Ramsay Criteria
Ramsay diagnostic criteria
Ramsay Diagnostic Criteria




Ramsay definition
Ramsay definition - A clinical definition of myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) developed by Melvin Ramsay after 30 years of treating and researching ME patients. Since this definition was in place before the U.S. Centers for Disease Control invented the term "chronic fatigue syndrome", the Ramsay definition is sometimes considered the last clinical definition that may be unbiased by the ensuing diagnostic confusion.
  • Ramsay definition - A clinical definition of myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) developed by Melvin Ramsay after 30 years of treating and researching ME patients. Since this definition was in place before the U.S. Centers for Disease Control invented the term "chronic fatigue syndrome", the Ramsay definition is sometimes considered the last clinical definition that may be unbiased by the ensuing diagnostic confusion.


Randomized controlled trial
Randomized Controlled Trial
Randomized controlled trials
randomized controlled trials
Randomized Controlled Trials
Randomised controlled trial
randomised controlled trial
Randomised Controlled Trial


RCT
randomized controlled trial
randomized controlled trial (RCT) - A trial in which participants are randomly assigned to two groups, with one group receiving the treatment being studied and a control or comparison group receiving a sham treatment, placebo, or comparison treatment.
  • randomized controlled trial (RCT) - A trial in which participants are randomly assigned to two groups, with one group receiving the treatment being studied and a control or comparison group receiving a sham treatment, placebo, or comparison treatment.[47]


S

Seahorse Analyzer






Seahorse analyzer
Seahorse analyzer - An instrument which measures oxygen consumption rate and extracellular acidification rate in live cells, in real time, producing information regarding important cellular functions such as mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis.
  • Seahorse analyzer - An instrument which measures oxygen consumption rate and extracellular acidification rate in live cells, in real time, producing information regarding important cellular functions such as mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis.



Serum
blood serum
Blood serum
Blood Serum




serum
serum - the clear yellowish fluid that remains from blood plasma after clotting factors have been removed by clot formation
  • serum - the clear yellowish fluid that remains from blood plasma after clotting factors have been removed by clot formation[48]



ME/CFS Severely Ill, Big Data Study
ME/CFS Severely Ill Big Data Study
ME/CFS severely ill, big data study
ME/CFS severely ill big data study
Severely Ill Big Data Study
Severely Ill, Big Data Study
Severely ill big data study
Severely ill patient study
Severely ill Patient Study
SIPS
Severely Ill Patient Study
Severely Ill Patient Study (SIPS) - A study funded by the Open Medicine Foundation and led by Ron Davis and Wenzhong Xiao. It includes over 1000 tests per patient, including the patients' genome, gene expression, metabolomics, microbiome, and others. Formerly known as the ME/CFS Severely Ill Big Data Study. (Learn more: www.omf.ngo)



Short Form 36 Health Survey
Short-form 36 Health Survey
Short Form 36 Item Health Survey
Short-form 36-Item Health Survey
SF36



SF-36
Short Form 36-Item Health Survey
Short Form 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36) - A 36-item patient-reported questionnaire, used to determine patient health status and quality of life.



Single nucleotide polymorphism
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
Single nucleotide polymorphisms
single nucleotide polymorphisms
Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms
Single nucleotide variant
single nucleotide variant
Single Nucleotide Variant
SNV
single nucleotide variants
SNP
single nucleotide polymorphism
single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) - A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, pronounced "snip") is a potential genetic mutation that occurs in a single spot in the human genome; a difference in a single DNA building block. SNPs are often represented by an "rs" number, such as "rs53576".
  • single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) - A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, pronounced "snip") is a potential genetic mutation that occurs in a single spot in the human genome; a difference in a single DNA building block.[49][50] SNPs are often represented by an "rs" number, such as "rs53576".[51]



Somatic






somatic
somatic - An adjective relating to the physical body or physical symptoms. It is often contrasted with the adjective "psychological", which refers to the human mind or mental symptoms. In biology, "somatic cells" refer to all the cells of the body, except those which form an egg or sperm.
  • somatic - An adjective relating to the physical body or physical symptoms. It is often contrasted with the adjective "psychological", which refers to the human mind or mental symptoms. In biology, "somatic cells" refer to all the cells of the body, except those which form an egg or sperm.


Conversion disorder
Conversion Disorder
somatization
Somatization
Somatoform disorder
conversion disorder
Somatic symptom disorder
Somatic Symptom Disorder
somatoform disorder
Somatoform Disorder
somatic symptom disorder
somatic symptom disorder - A psychiatric term to describe an alleged condition whereby a person's thoughts somehow cause physical symptoms. The actual existence of such a condition is highly controversial, due to a lack of scientific evidence. It is related to other psychiatric terms, such as "psychosomatic", "neurasthenia", and "hysteria". Older terms include "somatization", "somatoform disorder", and "conversion disorder". Such terms refer to a scientifically-unsupported theory that claims that a wide range of physical symptoms can be created by the human mind, a theory which has been criticized as "mind over matter" parapsychology, a pseudoscience. (Learn more: www.psychologytoday.com)
  • somatic symptom disorder - A psychiatric term to describe an alleged condition whereby a person's thoughts somehow cause physical symptoms. The actual existence of such a condition is highly controversial, due to a lack of scientific evidence. It is related to other psychiatric terms, such as "psychosomatic", "neurasthenia", and "hysteria". Older terms include "somatization", "somatoform disorder", and "conversion disorder". Such terms refer to a scientifically-unsupported theory that claims that a wide range of physical symptoms can be created by the human mind, a theory which has been criticized as "mind over matter" parapsychology, a pseudoscience. (Learn more: www.psychologytoday.com)[52]




Spoon Theory
Spoon theory
spoonie
Spoonie
spoonies
Spoonies



spoon theory
spoon theory - An analogy which equates the amount of ability that someone with chronic illness has to complete daily tasks to a limited number of spoons. People with chronic illnesses who must ration their energy throughout the day are sometimes referred to as "spoonies". (Learn more: butyoudontlooksick.com)
  • spoon theory - An analogy which equates the amount of ability that someone with chronic illness has to complete daily tasks to a limited number of spoons. People with chronic illnesses who must ration their energy throughout the day are sometimes referred to as "spoonies". (Learn more: butyoudontlooksick.com)[53]



Stress fracture
Stress Fracture
Stress fractures
stress fractures
Stress Fractures




stress fracture
stress fracture - A tiny crack in a bone caused by repetitive forces such as running or by normal use of a bone that's weakened by a condition such as osteoporosis.
  • stress fracture - A tiny crack in a bone caused by repetitive forces such as running or by normal use of a bone that's weakened by a condition such as osteoporosis.[54]


subluxations
Subluxation
Subluxations





subluxation
subluxation - partial dislocation (as of one of the bones in a joint)
  • subluxation - partial dislocation (as of one of the bones in a joint)[55]


Systemic exertion intolerance disease
Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease





SEID
systemic exertion intolerance disease
systemic exertion intolerance disease (SEID) - A term for ME/CFS that aims to avoid the stigma associated with the term "chronic fatigue syndrome", while emphasizing the defining characteristic of post-exertional malaise (PEM). SEID was defined as part of the diagnostic criteria put together by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) report of 10 February 2015.
  • systemic exertion intolerance disease (SEID) - A term for ME/CFS that aims to avoid the stigma associated with the term "chronic fatigue syndrome", while emphasizing the defining characteristic of post-exertional malaise (PEM). SEID was defined as part of the diagnostic criteria put together by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) report of 10 February 2015.[56]

T

T Cell
T cells
T Cells
T lymphocyte
T Lymphocyte
T lymphocytes
T Lymphocytes
T-cell
T-cells


T cell
T cell - A type of white blood cell which is mostly produced or matured in the thymus gland (hence T-cell) and is involved in the adaptive immune response on a cellular level. Also known as a T lymphocyte. (Learn more: www.youtube.com)
  • T cell - A type of white blood cell which is mostly produced or matured in the thymus gland (hence T-cell) and is involved in the adaptive immune response on a cellular level. Also known as a T lymphocyte. (Learn more: www.youtube.com)


Tachycardia






tachycardia
tachycardia - An unusually rapid heart beat. Can be caused by exercise or illness. A symptom of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS). (Learn more: www.heart.org)


Tilt table test
Tilt Table Test
tilt-table test
Tilt-table test
Tilt-table Test




tilt table test
tilt table test - A diagnostic test to determine orthostatic intolerance or other forms of dysautonomia. The patient is strapped to a table and the table is tilted while the patient is monitored.


Two-day cardiopulmonary exercise test
Two-day Cardiopulmonary Exercise Test
2-day cardiopulmonary exercise test
2-day Cardiopulmonary Exercise Test
two day cardiopulmonary exercise test
Two day cardiopulmonary exercise test
Two Day Cardiopulmonary Exercise Test
cardiopulmonary exercise test
Cardiopulmonary exercise test
Cardiopulmonary Exercise Test
CPET
two-day cardiopulmonary exercise test
two-day cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) - A diagnostic test which involves testing an ME/CFS patient exercising on an exercise machine, while monitoring their respiration, especially oxygen consumption. This test is repeated the following day in order to confirm the patient's inability to replicate the first-day performance. This test is thought to be the most objective way to detect post-exertional malaise.
  • two-day cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) - A diagnostic test which involves testing an ME/CFS patient exercising on an exercise machine, while monitoring their respiration, especially oxygen consumption. This test is repeated the following day in order to confirm the patient's inability to replicate the first-day performance. This test is thought to be the most objective way to detect post-exertional malaise.

U



CFS/ME Research Collaborative
U.K. CFS/ME Research Collaborative





CMRC
UK CFS/ME Research Collaborative
UK CFS/ME Research Collaborative (CMRC) - A UK group of researchers and ME/CFS patient groups led by Professor Stephen Holgate. Its launch in 2013 was covered by the Science Media Centre. Since 2014, the collaborative sponsors the CFS/ME Research Collaborative Conference.

V

Virome
Human Virome
human virome




virome
virome - The human virome is the collection of all viruses that are found in or on humans
  • virome - The human virome is the collection of all viruses that are found in or on humans[60]


VO2Max
VO2 Max
vO2 max
VO2 max
vO2 Max
vO2max
maximal oxygen consumption



VO2max
VO2max - the maximum amount of oxygen the body can utilize during a specified period of usually intense exercise
  • VO2max - the maximum amount of oxygen the body can utilize during a specified period of usually intense exercise[61]

W


World health organization





WHO
World Health Organization
World Health Organization (WHO) - "A specialized agency of the United Nations that is concerned with public health. It was established on 7 April 1948, and is headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland. The WHO is a member of the United Nations Development Group. Its predecessor, the Health Organization, was an agency of the League of Nations." The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD) is maintained by WHO.
  • World Health Organization (WHO) - "A specialized agency of the United Nations that is concerned with public health. It was established on 7 April 1948, and is headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland. The WHO is a member of the United Nations Development Group. Its predecessor, the Health Organization, was an agency of the League of Nations."[62] The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD) is maintained by WHO.[63]

X

Y

Z

See also

References

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  2. Zhu; Zeng; Wang. "Sensitivity, Specificity, Accuracy, Associated Confidence Interval and ROC Analysis with Practical SAS® Implementations" (PDF). Lex Jansen. Retrieved Nov 12, 2019. 
  3. "Action for ME". Wikipedia. Nov 5, 2016. 
  4. "Glossary". Health Research Authority. Retrieved Oct 31, 2019. 
  5. https://www.ahrq.gov/cpi/about/profile/index.html
  6. https://www.psychiatry.org/
  7. "NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms". cancer.gov. Retrieved Jan 14, 2020. 
  8. "assay". The Merriam-Webster.com. Retrieved Dec 19, 2019. 
  9. https://m.facebook.com/actionforme/photos/a.76870643208.71362.72990583208/10155087150888209/?type=3 Action for ME is pleased to announce the launch of our new Children's Services Team
  10. "B lymphocyte". TheFreeDictionary.com. Retrieved Nov 12, 2019. 
  11. "Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition". thefreedictionary. 2003. Retrieved Apr 18, 2019. 
  12. Carruthers, Bruce (2003). "Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Clinical Working Case Definition, Diagnostic and Treatment Protocols" (PDF). Invest in ME. Retrieved Nov 12, 2019. 
  13. "Cell membrane definition and meaning | Collins English Dictionary". www.collinsdictionary.com. Retrieved Oct 19, 2019. 
  14. "Definition of cerebellum". www.merriam-webster.com. Retrieved Dec 3, 2019. 
  15. https://www.cancer.gov/publications/dictionaries/cancer-terms/def/chronic-disease
  16. Carruthers, Bruce M.; van de Sande, Marjorie I.; De Meirleir, Kenny L.; Klimas, Nancy G.; Broderick, Gordon; Mitchell, Terry; Staines, Donald; Powles, A. C. Peter; Speight, Nigel; Vallings, Rosamund; Bateman, Lucinda; Baumgarten-Austrheim, Barbara; Bell, David; Carlo-Stella, Nicoletta; Chia, John; Darragh, Austin; Jo, Daehyun; Lewis, Donald; Light, Alan; Marshall-Gradisnik, Sonya; Mena, Ismael; Mikovits, Judy; Miwa, Kunihisa; Murovska, Modra; Pall, Martin; Stevens, Staci (Aug 22, 2011). "Myalgic encephalomyelitis: International Consensus Criteria". Journal of Internal Medicine. 270 (4): 327–338. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2796.2011.02428.x. ISSN 0954-6820. PMC 3427890Freely accessible. PMID 21777306. 
  17. "HHS Secretary Kills CFSAC!". #MEAction. Sep 7, 2018. Retrieved Nov 12, 2019. 
  18. https://www.merriam-webster.com/medical/clivus
  19. https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cofactor
  20. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK459185/
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  22. Jason, Leonard A.; Brown, Molly; Brown, Abigail; Evans, Meredyth; Flores, Samantha; Grant-Holler, Elisa; Sunnquist, Madison (Jan 14, 2013). "Energy Conservation/Envelope Theory Interventions to Help Patients with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome". Fatigue (Abingdon, Eng. Print). 1 (1-2): 27–42. doi:10.1080/21641846.2012.733602. ISSN 2164-1846. PMC 3596172Freely accessible. PMID 23504301. 
  23. Goudsmit, Ellen M.; Nijs, Jo; Jason, Leonard A.; Wallman, Karen E. (2012). "Pacing as a strategy to improve energy management in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome: a consensus document". Disability and Rehabilitation. 34 (13): 1140–1147. doi:10.3109/09638288.2011.635746. ISSN 1464-5165. PMID 22181560. 
  24. Oxford English Dictionary. 2019. 
  25. https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/primer/howgeneswork/epigenome
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