Genetic testing

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picture of a plastic tube holding a sample of saliva mixed with blue liquid
Saliva sample used for DNA testing

Genetic testing is a general term that can refer to several different types of tests:

  • DNA sequencing to find risk factors associated with genes, and risk of specific illnesses in off spring
  • Genetic testing to diagnose illness
  • Pharmacogenetics[1]

DNA sequencing for illness factors[edit | edit source]

Pharmacogenetics[edit | edit source]

By identifying genes which are linked to the metabolism of particular drugs or other substances, this aims to predict which drugs are best suited to individual people, and which may be potentially harmful.[1]

Diagnosis of genetic disorders[edit | edit source]

Theory[edit | edit source]

Genetic testing cannot diagnose ME or chronic fatigue syndrome, but is being in research to help find which genes may be linked to developing the illness, in order to improve understanding of the illness and investigate potent treatments.

Evidence[edit | edit source]

Subgroup[edit | edit source]

Cost and availability[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

  • [[

Genetics of chronic fatigue syndrome]]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.01.1 "Pharmacogenetics - Clinical Pharmacology". MSD Manual Professional Edition. Retrieved Feb 23, 2020. 

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A fatigue-based illness. The term CFS was invented invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control as an replacement for myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). Some view CFS as a neurological disease, others use the term for any unexplained long-term fatigue. Sometimes used as a the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, despite the different diagnostic criteria.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.