Report of the joint working group of the Royal Colleges of Physicians, Psychiatrists and General Practitioners

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Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Report of a joint working group of the Royal Colleges of Physicians, Psychiatrists and General Practitioners on chronic fatigue syndrome, or the Joint Royal Colleges' Report is a British report published in 1996.[1]

Aim[edit | edit source]

The report "aimed to provide the information necessary for knowledge-based care and indicate what facilities and services provisions were required for the management of CFS in primary health care."[1]

The report also provided a summary of research and stated that "well-defined research endeavours and clinical trials" were needed for chronic fatigue syndrome.[1]

Funding[edit | edit source]

Authors[edit | edit source]

The following working group members authored the report on behalf of the Royal College of Physicans, Royal College of Psychiatrists, and Royal College of General Practitioners:

Citation[edit | edit source]

Royal Colleges of Physicians, Psychiatrists and General Practitioners (1996). Chronic fatigue syndrome. Report of a joint working group of the Royal Colleges of Physicians, Psychiatrists and General Practitioners. CR 54.

Conclusions[edit | edit source]

The joint Royal Colleges' report stated that chronic fatigue syndrome was an "the expression of the interplay of physical and psychological factors" and that a "joint medical and psychological approach" was needed.[1] It also stated that chronic fatigue syndrome affected both young and old people, of any occupation and social class.[1]

Criticism[edit | edit source]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

  • 1996, (revised 2014), Comparison of the American Report for Physicians on CFS with the UK Joint Royal Colleges' Report on CFS[2](Full text)
  • 1996, OBSERVATIONS ON THE JOINT REPORT OF THE UK ROYAL COLLEGES OF PHYSICIANS, PSYCHIATRISTS AND GENERAL PRACTITIONERS ON CHRONIC FATIGUE SYNDROME, OCTOBER 1996 / CR 54 / RCP[3](Full text)
  • 2003, THE MENTAL HEALTH MOVEMENT: PERSECUTION OF PATIENTS? A consideration of the role of Professor Simon Wessely and other members of the "Wessely School" in the perception of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) in the UK.Background Briefing for the House of Commons Select Health Committee.[4](Full text)
The tactics of denial section includes examples of the misrepresentation of the Joint Royal Colleges' report by members of the Wessely school

Learn more[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A controversial term, invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, that generally refers to a collection of symptoms as “fatigue”. There have been multiple attempts to come up with a set of diagnostic criteria to define this term, but few of those diagnostic criteria are currently in use. Previous attempts to define this term include the Fukuda criteria and the Oxford criteria. Some view the term as a useful diagnostic category for people with long-term fatigue of unexplained origin. Others view the term as a derogatory term borne out of animus towards patients. Some view the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, while others view myalgic encephalomyelitis as a distinct disease.

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A controversial term, invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, that generally refers to a collection of symptoms as “fatigue”. There have been multiple attempts to come up with a set of diagnostic criteria to define this term, but few of those diagnostic criteria are currently in use. Previous attempts to define this term include the Fukuda criteria and the Oxford criteria. Some view the term as a useful diagnostic category for people with long-term fatigue of unexplained origin. Others view the term as a derogatory term borne out of animus towards patients. Some view the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, while others view myalgic encephalomyelitis as a distinct disease.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
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