Richard Horton

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Richard Horton, FRCP FRCPCH FMedSci, is the editor-in-chief of The Lancet since 1990.[1][2]

Education[edit | edit source]

  • Qualified in physiology and medicine from the University of Birmingham.

Honorary professor and other honors[edit | edit source]

  • Honorary professor at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, University College London, and the University of Oslo
  • Honorary doctorates in medicine from the University of Birmingham, UK, and the Universities of Umea and Gothenburg in Sweden

Other academic positions[edit | edit source]

The World Health Organization (WHO) lists the following:[3]

  • First President of the World Association of Medical Editors
  • Council member of both the UK's Academy of Medical Sciences and the University of Birmingham
  • Senior Associate of the UK health-policy think-tank, the Nuffield Trust
  • Foreign Associate of the US Institute of Medicine, elected 2011

PACE trial[edit | edit source]

The Lancet published the PACE trial results but has not released the data. A UK Tribunal has ordered the release of this data.[4]

In a radio interview, Dr. Horton called the critics “a fairly small, but highly organized, very vocal and very damaging group of individuals who have, I would say, actually hijacked this agenda and distorted the debate so that it actually harms the overwhelming majority of patients.” He didn’t address the substance of the criticisms.[5] As of September 6, 2016, 12,233 people signed the petition Misleading PACE claims should be retracted[6] and the petition, when over 11,000 signatures, was delivered to The Lancet and made the Wall Street Journal.[7]

Richard Horton has refused to engage with scientists such as Dr. David Tuller over the PACE trial and ignored requests of a response to the PACE trial scandal. Many have tried to contact him on Twitter regarding the trial but he has refused to respond and blocked them.[8].

Open letters to Richard Horton and/or The Lancet RE: PACE trial[edit | edit source]

PACE trial headings will have Open letters from:

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

World Health Organization (WHO) - "A specialized agency of the United Nations that is concerned with public health. It was established on 7 April 1948, and is headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland. The WHO is a member of the United Nations Development Group. Its predecessor, the Health Organization, was an agency of the League of Nations." The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD) is maintained by WHO. (Learn more: en.wikipedia.org)

World Health Organization (WHO) - "A specialized agency of the United Nations that is concerned with public health. It was established on 7 April 1948, and is headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland. The WHO is a member of the United Nations Development Group. Its predecessor, the Health Organization, was an agency of the League of Nations." The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD) is maintained by WHO. (Learn more: en.wikipedia.org)

PACE trial - A controversial study which claimed that CBT and GET were effective in treating "CFS/ME", despite the fact that its own data did not support this conclusion. Its results and methodology were widely disputed by patients, scientists, and the peer-reviewed scientific literature.

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From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.