Sphingolipid

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Sphingolipids are any of a class of compounds that are fatty acid conjugates of sphingosine and occur chiefly in the cell membranes of the brain and nervous tissue. They not only help make up the structure of membranes but also have important cell signaling roles.[1]

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  1. Heung LJ, Luberto C, Del Poeta M. Role of sphingolipids in microbial pathogenesis. Infect Immun. 2006 Jan;74(1):28-39. DOI: 10.1128/IAI.74.1.28-39.2006 http://iai.asm.org/content/74/1/28.full

membrane - The word "membrane" can have different meanings in different fields of biology. In cell biology, a membrane is a layer of molecules that surround its contents. Examples of cell-biology membranes include the "cell membrane" that surrounds a cell, the "mitochondrial membranes" that form the outer layers of mitochondria, and the "viral envelope" that surrounds enveloped viruses. In anatomy or tissue biology, a membrane is a barrier formed by a layer of cells. Examples of anatomical membranes include the pleural membranes that surrounds the lungs, the pericardium which surrounds the heart, and some of the layers within the blood-brain barrier.

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From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.