Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Volume 12, Issue 4, 2004

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Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome[edit | edit source]

Volume 12, Issue 4, 2004[edit | edit source]

  • Editorial by Kenny De Meirleir & Neil McGregor
  • Cognitive Function Index for Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
    Abstract - Background: A comprehensive approach to assessing neuropsychological deficits in CFS patients is developed by assessing cognitive function across a number of domains using a battery of tests, rather than relying on any single instrument. Objective: A factor analytic approach was employed to examine the underlying dimensionality of 15 standard cognitive function related test variables in ]]CFS]] patients. A cognitive function index (CFI) was then developed using appropriately weighted and interpreted factors. Methods: Factor analysis was applied to an initial sample of 65 CFS patients, identifying eight factors accounting for over 70% of total variation. This factor structure was then independently verified on a separate sample of 124 CFS patients. An overall combined CFS sample of 212 was then used to derive the CFI using an appropriately interpreted and weighted average of the derived factors. Results: After including age and education as separate factors, the CFI consists of nine factors accounting for 70% of total variation in the overall CFS group. The CFI was not affected by the presence of current psychiatric comorbidity. A cut-off score for cognitive dysfunction was established using the lower quartile value of a group of sedentary controls on the same index. Conclusions: The CFI will provide a useful summary measure for researchers investigating cognitive function performance in CFS patients. It does not replace existing individual specialized tests[1]
  • Family Medical History of Persons with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
    Abstract - Background: Little research has examined the family history of persons with CFS, although a few studies have found people with CFS may be more likely to have family members with fatigue or CFS-like conditions, cancers, autoimmune illness, and early parental death. Research into the family history of fatigue, chronic fatigue syndrome, and other medical or psychiatric illness may help inform the etiology of this illness. Objectives: The present investigation examined the occurrence of medical and psychiatric illness in the family history of persons with CFS, and then compared these results with the family history of medical illness reported by a control group of persons without fatigue. Methods: Family medical history data was obtained from questionnaire responses, a medical assessment, and medical records, and were then classified into specific illness categories, using the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10). Family history data was compared among three groups using logistic regression analyses. Results: Results indicated that persons with chronic fatigue syndrome were significantly more likely to report a family history of endocrine/ metabolic disorders when compared to the control group. Conclusions: Findings suggest an underlying familial predisposition toward the development of both CFS and endocrine/metabolic disorders. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that CFS represents a deregulation of the endocrine system.[2]
  • Hypnosis in the Management of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
    Abstract - During the past 30 years hypnosis has become recognised as a useful adjunct to traditional medical therapies, and has become part of mainstream medicine. Hypnosis societies provide training for health professionals to obtain registrable qualifications. The modality has been incorporated in the management of many medical conditions and diseases, with opportunities for symptom control, building confidence and enhancing the benefits of regular therapies. There are many opportunities for using hypnosis as an adjunctive therapy in the management of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, despite some early difficulties. Problems likely to be encountered are discussed and the structure of the hypnosis session is outlined. Suggestions are given for practitioners to construct useful scripts, which can be used to teach self-hypnosis.[3]
  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Editorial Bias in the British Medical Journal
    Abstract - A literature search identified all papers published on chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) in the British Medical Journal between 1995 and 2000. Analysis of the findings revealed a bias towards the views of one school of thought and a lack of papers on the immunological or virological aspects of CFS. This contrasts with the mainstream American journals, which generally covered a much wider range of subjects and views. We examine the arguments for and against covert editorial policies, and summarise the results of discussions with the relevant individuals and organisations.[4]
  • AACFS 7th International Conference - Conference Reports.[5]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Michael Brimacombe, Gudrun Lange, Kim Bisuchio, Donald S. Ciccone & Benjamin Natelson. (2004). Cognitive Function Index for Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 12, Iss. 4, pp. 3-23. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v12n04_02
  2. Susan R. Torres-Harding, Leonard A. Jason & O. Dicle Turkoglu. (2004). Family Medical History of Persons with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 12, Iss. 4, pp. 25-35. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v12n04_03
  3. Rosamund Vallings. (2004). Hypnosis in the Management of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 12, Iss. 4, pp. 37-46. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v12n04_04
  4. Goudsmit, Ellen; Stouten, Bart (2004), "Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Editorial Bias in the British Medical Journal", Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, 12 (4): 47-59, doi:10.1300/J092v12n04_05 
  5. Rosamund Vallings. (2004). AACFS 7th International Conference. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 12, Iss. 4, pp. 61-79. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v12n04_06

"Bias in research is "a systematic deviation of an observation from the true clinical state" (Sackett et al., 1986).[1]

Myalgic encephalomyelitis or M.E. has different diagnostic criteria to chronic fatigue syndrome; neurological symptoms are required but fatigue is an optional symptom.Cite error: Closing </ref> missing for <ref> tag

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