Maria Vera

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Maria Vera, MD, (aka Maria Vera Nunez) is an Internist and researcher at the Institute for Neuro Immune Medicine (INIM), as well as, an Associate Professor at the College of Osteopathic Medicine at Nova Southeastern University, in Miami and Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

Her bio on the INIM webpage states that: "Her research interest is focused in the development of tools and application of medical informatics to improve the education and care of patients with CFS/ME. She is also working on the potential role of immunomodulators and understanding the pathophysiologic pathways for CFS/ME, to recognize other therapeutic targets and management options for this condition."[1]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

  • 2009, Sleep Patterns in CFS Patients and the Immunoimodulatory Effects of Xyrem in Patients with Alpha Intrusion. Hone N, Garcia L, Vera MA, Chediak N, Klimas NG. 9th International IACFS/ME Conference. Reno, Nevada.
  • 2009, Immune and Viral Response to Isoprinosine in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Vera MA, Fletcher MA, Cuba C, Garcia L, Klimas NG. 9th International IACFS/ME Conference. Reno, Nevada.
  • 2010, Mysterious Paralysis: A Case of Thyrotoxic Periodic Paralysis. Vera MA. FL Chapter ACP Annual Meeting 2010.
  • Immune and Viral Response to Isoprinosine in Women with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Vera MA. Women's Health Research Day. Institute for Women's Health, University of Miami, Florida.
  • 2011, Vitamin D and IL 10 in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Vera MA, Rey I, Garcia L, Fletcher MA, Klimas NG. 10th International IACFS/ME Conference. Ontario, Canada.
  • Abnormal Cytokine Levels in Patients with CFS Regardless of Metabolic Syndrome. Vera MA, Garcia L, Valencia WM, Barnes Z, Fletcher MA, Klimas NG. 10th International IACFS/ME Conference. Ontario, Canada.
  • 2016, Poor sleep quality is associated with greater circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines and severity and frequency of chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) symptoms in women[2] - (Full Text)

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. http://www.nova.edu/nim/clinic/dr-vera-bio-page.html
  2. Milrad, Sara F.; Hall, Daniel L.; Jutagir, Devika R.; Lattie, Emily G.; Ironson, Gail H.; Wohlgemuth, William; Vera Nunez, Maria; Garcia, Lina; Czaja, Sara J.; Perdomo, Dolores M.; Fletcher, Mary Ann; Klimas, Nancy; Antoni, Michael H. (2016), "Poor sleep quality is associated with greater circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines and severity and frequency of chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) symptoms in women", Journal of Neuroimmunology, 0 (0), doi:10.1016/j.jneuroim.2016.12.008 

ME/CFS - An acronym that combines myalgic encephalomyelitis with chronic fatigue syndrome. Sometimes they are combined because people have trouble distinguishing one from the other. Sometimes they are combined because people see them as synonyms of each other.

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A fatigue-based illness. The term CFS was invented invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control as an replacement for myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). Some view CFS as a neurological disease, others use the term for any unexplained long-term fatigue. Sometimes used as a the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, despite the different diagnostic criteria.

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A fatigue-based illness. The term CFS was invented invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control as an replacement for myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). Some view CFS as a neurological disease, others use the term for any unexplained long-term fatigue. Sometimes used as a the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, despite the different diagnostic criteria.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.