Brian Angus

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Brian J. Angus, FRCP, is the Director of the Oxford Centre for Clinical Tropical Medicine and a Clinical Tutor in Medicine and Associate Professor and Reader in Infectious Diseases, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, UK. His current research focus is on clinical trials in influenza, HIV, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, C. difficile-Associated Diarrhea and typhoid.[1]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

PACE trial publications include:

Main trial outcome
Other PACE trial publications

Talks and interviews[edit | edit source]

Online presence[edit | edit source]

  • PubMed
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Website
  • YouTube

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

  • King's College, London

References[edit | edit source]

Oxford University - a prestigious university located in Oxford, England renowned for its teaching and research in health and medicine

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A fatigue-based illness. The term CFS was invented invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control as an replacement for myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). Some view CFS as a neurological disease, others use the term for any unexplained long-term fatigue. Sometimes used as a the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, despite the different diagnostic criteria.

PACE trial - A controversial study which claimed that CBT and GET were effective in treating "CFS/ME", despite the fact that its own data did not support this conclusion. Its results and methodology were widely disputed by patients, scientists, and the peer-reviewed scientific literature.

somatic symptom disorder - A psychiatric term to describe an alleged condition whereby a person's thoughts somehow cause physical symptoms. The actual existence of such a condition is highly controversial, due to a lack of scientific evidence. It is related to other psychiatric terms, such as "psychosomatic", "neurasthenia", and "hysteria". Older terms include "somatization", "somatoform disorder", and "conversion disorder". Such terms refer to a scientifically-unsupported theory that claims that a wide range of physical symptoms can be created by the human mind, a theory which has been criticized as "mind over matter" parapsychology, a pseudoscience. Although "Somatic Symptom Disorder" is the term used by DSM-5, the term "Bodily Distress Disorder" has been proposed for ICD-11. (Learn more: www.psychologytoday.com)

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.