Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Volume 2, Issue 2-3, 1996

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Titles and abstracts for the Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Volume 2, Issue 2-3, 1996.

Volume 2, Issue 2-3, 1996[edit | edit source]

  • Poster Session II[1]
  • Symposium B: Related Disorders - Gulf War Syndrome[2]
  • Session X: CFS - Natural History and Epidemiology[3]
  • Natural Course of CFS and Its Predictors by G. Bleijenberg, J.N.H.M. Vercoulen, E. Bazelmans, C.M.A. Swanink, J.F.M. Fennis, J.M.D. Galama, and J.W.M. van der Meer.
  • The Natural History of CFS in the CDC Surveillance System by J.G. Dobbins, M. Reyes, N. Cole, P.L. Stee1, B. Randall, and W.C. Reeves.
  • Demographic Data on Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome University Hospital in Stockholm by B. Evengård, G. Lindh, L. Lindqvist, and R. Olin.
  • Session IX: CFS - Treatment[4]
  • A Review of the Use of Antiviral and Immuno-modulating Drugs in the Treatment of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome by K. De Meirleir;
  • A New Model for Handling CFS Patients at an Out-Patient Department of Infectious Diseases in Sweden by R. Engqvist, C. Hedenstedt, B. Evengård, G. Lindh, L. Lindqvist, and R. Olin;
  • An Overview of Clinical Experience in the U.S.A. with Ampligen® (Poly I:Poly C12U) in the Treatment of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome by D.R. Strayer and W.A. Carter.
  • Poster Session I[5]
  • Session VIII: CFS - Clinical Observations[6]
  • Symptom Perceptions and Quality of Life in Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) and GI Disorders by H. Hyrnan and T. Wasser.
  • Session VII: CFS - Neuropsychology[7]
  • Generalized Anxiety Disorder in the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome by B. Fischler, R. Cluydts, V. De Gucht, L. Kaufman, and K. De Meirleir;
  • The Cardiff Chronic Fatigue Study - The First 300 Patients by A.P. Smith, L.K. Borysiewicz, J. Pollack, and M. Thomas;
  • Psychic and Psychosomatic Complaints in CFS Patients by U.T. Egle, W. Nix, and R. Schwab;
  • Neurasthenia Revisited: ICD-10 and DSMIIIR Psychiatric Syndrome and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients and Controls by A. E. Farmer, I. Jones, J. Hillier, M. Llewellyn, L. Borysiewicz, and A. Smith;
  • Analysis of Aspects of Personality and Life Style in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome by E. R. Neerinckx, B. Van Houdenhove, H. Bobbaers, and D. Blockmans.
  • Session VI: CFS - Functional Neuro-Imaging[8]
  • Radionuclide Brain Imaging in Patients with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) by D.C. Costa.
  • Session V: CFS - Immunology[9]
  • Immunopathogenesis of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome by N.G. Klimas
  • Immunologic Abnormalities in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome by U. Tirelli, M. Tavio, and A. Pinto;
  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Evaluation of a 30-Criteria-Score and Correlation with Immune Activation by A. Hilgers and J. Frank;
  • Lymphocyte Subsets, Apoptosis and Cytokines in Patients with the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome by C.M.A. Swanink, J.H.M.M. Vercnulen, J. M. D. Galama, M. T. L. Roos, L. Meyaard, J. van der Ven-Jongekrijg, R. de Nijs, G. Bleijenberg, J.F.M. Fernis, F. Miedema, and J.W.M. van der Meer
  • Session IV: CFS - Microbiologic Pathogenesis[10]
  • Microbial Pathogens as a Cause of CFS by J.M.D. Galama, C.M.A. Swanink, J.H.M.M. Vercoulen, J.F.M. Fennis, G. Bleijenberg, and J.W.M. van der Meer;
  • Borna Disease Virus in the Atlanta CFS Case-Control Study by J.G. Dobbins, W.I. Lipkin, C. Even, A.C. Mawle;
  • Demonstration of Borna Disease Virus RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from Japanese Patients with CFS by K. Ikuta, T. Nakaya, H. Takahashi, Y. Nakamura, S. Asahi, M. Tobiume, H. Kuratsune, K. Yamaguti, R. Inagi, K. Yamanishi, T. Kitani;
  • Failure to Demonstrate Enterovirus in Swedish Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome by G. Lindh, A. Samuelson, K.O. Hedlund, B. Evengård, L. Lindqvist, and A. Ehrnst;
  • Enterovirus Replication and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome by J. W. Gow, W. M. H. Behan, P. Cash, K. Simpson, D. Kay, M. M. McGill, and P.O. Behan
  • Symposium A: Related Disorders - Post-Polio Syndrome - Exercise capacity in post-polio patients[11]
  • Session III: CFS - Muscle[12]
  • Muscle Studies in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome by W.M.H. Behan;
  • Identification of Enteroviral RNA Detected in Muscle Biopsies from Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome of Myositis, Using Reverse Transcription-Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction and Nucleotide Sequencing by B. Sotefiou, H. Zhang, D.R. Woodrow, R.J.M. Lane, and L.C. Archard;
  • Alterations in Muscles of CFS Patients at Morphological, Biochemical and Molecular Level by E. Pizzigallo, A. Di Girolamo, G. Montanari, L. Dragani, J. Vecchiet, and G. Calella [13]
  • Session II: CFS - Neuro-Endocrinology[14]
  • Neuroendocrinology of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome by T.G. Dinan
  • Neuroendocrinological Studies in Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome by B. Evengård, P. Eneroth, C-G. Nilsson, L Lindqvist, G. Lindh, and R. Olin;
  • Preliminary Evidence for a Molecular Basis to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome by N.R.McGregor, R.H. Dunstan, M. Zerbes, H.L. Butt, T. K. Roberts, and I. J. Klineberg;
  • Defective Dexamethasone Induced Growth Hormone Release in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Evidence for Cerebral Glucocorticoid Receptor Resistance by T. Majeed, T. G. Dinan, and P.O. Behan
  • Session I: CFS Assessment[15]
  • Guidelines for Evaluating and Defining CFS by Keiji Fukuda;
  • Multi-dimensional Assessment in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome by J. Vercoulen, E. Bazelmans, C. Swanink, J. Fennis, J. Galama, J. Van Der Meer, and G. Bleijenberg
  • The Elusive Gulf War Syndrome[16]
  • Trial of a Selective Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitor, Galanthamine Hydrobromide, in the Treatment of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome[17]
  • Chronic Ciguatera:One Organic Cause of the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome[18]
  • Polioencephalitis and the Brain Fatigue Generator Model of Post-Viral Fatigue Syndromes[19]
  • Introduction by Peter O. Behan & Kenny De Meirleir[20]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Haworth Continuing Features Submission. (1996). Poster Session II.Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 2, Iss. 2-3, pp 139-166 . http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v02n02_19
  2. Haworth Continuing Features Submission. (1996). Symposium B: Related Disorders - Gulf War Syndrome.Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 2, Iss. 2-3, pp 135-138. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v02n02_18
  3. Haworth Continuing Features Submission. (1996). Session X: CFS - Natural History and Epidemiology.Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 2, Iss. 2-3, pp 131-133. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v02n02_17
  4. Haworth Continuing Features Submission. (1996). Session IX: CFS - Treatment.Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 2, Iss. 2-3, pp 127-129. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v02n02_16
  5. Haworth Continuing Features Submission. (1996). Poster Session I Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 2, Iss. 2-3, pp 103-125. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v02n02_15
  6. Haworth Continuing Features Submission. (1996). Session VIII: CFS - Clinical Observations. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 2, Iss. 2-3, pp 100-102. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v02n02_14
  7. Haworth Continuing Features Submission. (1996). Session VII: CFS - Neuropsychology Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 2, Iss. 2-3, pp 95-99. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v02n02_13
  8. Haworth Continuing Features Submission. (1996). Session VI: CFS - Functional Neuro-Imaging. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 2, Iss. 2-3, pp 93-94. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v02n02_12.
  9. Haworth Continuing Features Submission. (1996). Session V: CFS - Immunology. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 2, Iss. 2-3, pp 87-91. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v02n02_11
  10. Haworth Continuing Features Submission. (1996). Session IV: CFS - Microbiologic Pathogenesis. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 2, Iss. 2-3, pp 81-86. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v02n02_10
  11. A. Beelen, F. Nollet, and A. J. Sargeant. (1996). Exercise capacity in post-polio patients. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 2, Iss. 2-3, pp 79-80. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v02n02_09
  12. Haworth Continuing Features Submission. (1996). Session III: CFS - Muscle. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 2, Iss. 2-3, pp 73-77. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v02n02_08
  13. Haworth Continuing Features Submission. (1996). Session III: CFS - Muscle. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 2, Iss. 2-3, pp 73-77. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v02n02_08
  14. Haworth Continuing Features Submission. (1996). Session II: CFS - Neuro-Endocrinology. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 2, Iss. 2-3, pp 69-72. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v02n02_07
  15. Haworth Continuing Features Submission. (1996). Session I: CFS Assessment. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 2, Iss. 2-3, pp 67-68. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v02n02_06
  16. Paul H. Levine. (1996). The Elusive Gulf War Syndrome. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 2, Iss. 2-3, pp 55-63. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v02n02_05
  17. Ernir Snorrason, Arni Geirsson & Kari Stefansson. (1996). Trial of a Selective Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitor, Galanthamine Hydrobromide, in the Treatment of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 2, Iss. 2-3, pp 35-54. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v02n02_04
  18. John Pearn. (1996). Chronic Ciguatera: One Organic Cause of the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 2, Iss. 2-3, pp 29-34. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v02n02_03
  19. Richard L. Bruno, Nancy M. Frick, Susan Creange, Jerald R. Zimmerman & Todd Lewis. (1996). Polioencephalitis and the Brain Fatigue Generator Model of Post-Viral Fatigue Syndromes. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 2, Iss. 2-3, pp 85-96. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v02n02_02
  20. Peter O. Behan & Kenny De Meirleir. (1996). Introduction. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 2, Iss. 2-3, pp 1-2. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v02n02_01

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) - The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is a U.S. government agency dedicated to epidemiology and public health. It operates under the auspices of the Department of Health and Human Services.

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A controversial term, invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, that generally refers to a collection of symptoms as “fatigue”. There have been multiple attempts to come up with a set of diagnostic criteria to define this term, but few of those diagnostic criteria are currently in use. Previous attempts to define this term include the Fukuda criteria and the Oxford criteria. Some view the term as a useful diagnostic category for people with long-term fatigue of unexplained origin. Others view the term as a derogatory term borne out of animus towards patients. Some view the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, while others view myalgic encephalomyelitis as a distinct disease.

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A controversial term, invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, that generally refers to a collection of symptoms as “fatigue”. There have been multiple attempts to come up with a set of diagnostic criteria to define this term, but few of those diagnostic criteria are currently in use. Previous attempts to define this term include the Fukuda criteria and the Oxford criteria. Some view the term as a useful diagnostic category for people with long-term fatigue of unexplained origin. Others view the term as a derogatory term borne out of animus towards patients. Some view the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, while others view myalgic encephalomyelitis as a distinct disease.

somatic symptom disorder - A psychiatric term to describe an alleged condition whereby a person's thoughts somehow cause physical symptoms. The actual existence of such a condition is highly controversial, due to a lack of scientific evidence. It is related to other psychiatric terms, such as "psychosomatic", "neurasthenia", and "hysteria". Older terms include "somatization", "somatoform disorder", and "conversion disorder". Such terms refer to a scientifically-unsupported theory that claims that a wide range of physical symptoms can be created by the human mind, a theory which has been criticized as "mind over matter" parapsychology, a pseudoscience. Although "Somatic Symptom Disorder" is the term used by DSM-5, the term "Bodily Distress Disorder" has been proposed for ICD-11. (Learn more: www.psychologytoday.com)

International Classification of Diseases (ICD) - A system of medical diagnostic codes, created by the World Health Organization (WHO), to classify diseases and other health related conditions for the purpose of international diagnostic consistency. By having common diagnostic codes around the world, health researchers are better able to quantify and track disease burdens. The most current version is called ICD-11. (Learn more: www.who.int)

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

apoptosis - a type of cell death in which a cell, in response to a threat, initiates a series of molecular steps that lead to its orderly death. This is one method the body uses to get rid of unneeded or abnormal cells. This form of cell suicide is also called programmed cell death.

enterovirus - A genus of RNA viruses which typically enter the body through the respiratory or gastrointestinal systems and sometimes spread to the central nervous system or other parts of the body, causing neurological, cardiac, and other damage. Since the first reports of myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), enteroviruses have been suspected as a cause of ME. Enteroviruses have also been implicated as the cause of Type I diabetes, congestive heart failure, and other conditions. Enteroviruses include poliovirus, coxsackieviruses, and many others. New enteroviruses and new strains of existing enteroviruses are continuously being discovered. (Learn more: viralzone.expasy.org)

enterovirus - A genus of RNA viruses which typically enter the body through the respiratory or gastrointestinal systems and sometimes spread to the central nervous system or other parts of the body, causing neurological, cardiac, and other damage. Since the first reports of myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), enteroviruses have been suspected as a cause of ME. Enteroviruses have also been implicated as the cause of Type I diabetes, congestive heart failure, and other conditions. Enteroviruses include poliovirus, coxsackieviruses, and many others. New enteroviruses and new strains of existing enteroviruses are continuously being discovered. (Learn more: viralzone.expasy.org)

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.