Betsy Keller

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Source: ithaca.edu

Betsy A. Keller, PhD, is a professor in the Department of Exercise & Sport Sciences at Ithaca College in New York. She is a fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), past member of the Board of Trustees of ACSM, and past president and former department chair of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Chapter of ACSM.

Since 2005, she has provided 2-day cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) for persons with ME/CFS for purposes of research and/or to provide an objective assessment of functional capacity and ability to perform and recover following physical work for disability reports. She studies the effects of physical activity in ME/CFS on parameters of physiological and immune function.[1]

In 2015 Keller said "Given what we have learned in the past eight years about this illness, it is intellectually embarrassing to suggest that ME is a psychological illness."[2]

In 2017, Dr. Keller became an exercise physiology researcher at the Center for Enervating NeuroImmune Disease, Cornell University, New York, an ME/CFS Collaborative Research Center partially funded by the NIH.[3]

Boards and committees[edit | edit source]

Institute of Medicine committee[edit | edit source]

Keller was one of the experts on the "Committee on the Diagnostic Criteria for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome" that was convened for the 2015 Institute of Medicine report.[4]

ME/CFS Common Data Element (CDE) Project[edit | edit source]

Member of the Post-Exertional Malaise Working Group and Quality of Life/Functional Status (CPET)/Activity Working Group of the Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Common Data Element (CDE) Project sponsored by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.[5]


Notable studies[edit | edit source]

Talks and interviews[edit | edit source]

Online presence[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Syndrome, Committee on the Diagnostic Criteria for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue; Populations, Board on the Health of Select; Medicine, Institute of (Feb 10, 2015). Biographical Sketches of Committee Members, Consultants, and Staff. National Academies Press (US). 
  2. Speedy, Dr (Jan 22, 2015). "THE NICEGUIDELINES BLOG: Exercise physiologist Prof Keller: it is intellectually embarrassing to still suggest that ME is a psychological illness". THE NICEGUIDELINES BLOG. Retrieved Oct 11, 2019. 
  3. "Cornell Center for Enervating NeuroImmune Disease". neuroimmune.cornell.edu. Retrieved Aug 9, 2018. 
  4. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK284904/
  5. "Complete Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome CDE Roster". NIH. Retrieved Oct 11, 2019. 
  6. Keller, Betsy A; Pryor, John; Giloteaux, Ludovic (2014). "Inability of myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome patients to reproduce VO2peak indicates functional impairment". Journal of Translational Medicine. 12 (1): 104. doi:10.1186/1479-5876-12-104. ISSN 1479-5876. PMID 24755065. 
  7. Giloteaux, Ludovic; Hanson, Maureen R.; Keller, Betsy (2016), "A Pair of Identical Twins Discordant for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Differ in Physiological Parameters and Gut Microbiome Composition", American Journal of Case Reports, 17: 720-729, doi:10.12659/AJCR.900314 
  8. Mandarano, AH; Giloteaux, L; Keller, BA; Levine, SM; Hanson, MR (2018), "Eukaryotes in the gut microbiota in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome", PeerJ, 6: e4282, doi:10.7717/peerj.4282 
  9. Stevens, Staci; Snell, Chris; Stevens, Jared; Keller, Betsy; VanNess, J. Mark (2018). "Cardiopulmonary Exercise Test Methodology for Assessing Exertion Intolerance in Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome". Frontiers in Pediatrics. 6. doi:10.3389/fped.2018.00242. ISSN 2296-2360. 
  10. "ME/CFS Canadian Collaborative Team Conference program" (PDF). Retrieved Mar 6, 2019. 

two-day cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) - A diagnostic test which involves testing an ME/CFS patient exercising on an exercise machine, while monitoring their respiration, especially oxygen consumption. This test is repeated the following day in order to confirm the patient's inability to replicate the first-day performance. This test is thought to be the most objective way to detect post-exertional malaise.

ME/CFS - An acronym that combines myalgic encephalomyelitis with chronic fatigue syndrome. Sometimes they are combined because people have trouble distinguishing one from the other. Sometimes they are combined because people see them as synonyms of each other.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A controversial term, invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, that generally refers to a collection of symptoms as “fatigue”. There have been multiple attempts to come up with a set of diagnostic criteria to define this term, but few of those diagnostic criteria are currently in use. Previous attempts to define this term include the Fukuda criteria and the Oxford criteria. Some view the term as a useful diagnostic category for people with long-term fatigue of unexplained origin. Others view the term as a derogatory term borne out of animus towards patients. Some view the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, while others view myalgic encephalomyelitis as a distinct disease.

microbiome - The full collection of microscopic organisms (especially bacteria and fungi) which are present in a particular environment, particularly inside the human body.

eukaryote - any cell or organism that possesses a clearly defined nucleus, unlike bacteria. Eukaryotes include yeast, fungus, plants, and animals.

two-day cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) - A diagnostic test which involves testing an ME/CFS patient exercising on an exercise machine, while monitoring their respiration, especially oxygen consumption. This test is repeated the following day in order to confirm the patient's inability to replicate the first-day performance. This test is thought to be the most objective way to detect post-exertional malaise.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A controversial term, invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, that generally refers to a collection of symptoms as “fatigue”. There have been multiple attempts to come up with a set of diagnostic criteria to define this term, but few of those diagnostic criteria are currently in use. Previous attempts to define this term include the Fukuda criteria and the Oxford criteria. Some view the term as a useful diagnostic category for people with long-term fatigue of unexplained origin. Others view the term as a derogatory term borne out of animus towards patients. Some view the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, while others view myalgic encephalomyelitis as a distinct disease.

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